Acceptance or tolerance: Exploring the Attitudes of Heterosexual Workers towards Their LGBT Peers

  • Joel Rodríguez-Polo Carlos Albizu University, San Juan
  • Carmen Rivera, B.A. Carlos Albizu University, San Juan
  • Patricia Serrano, B.A. Carlos Albizu University, San Juan
  • José Estades, B.A. Carlos Albizu University, San Juan
  • Jeyvelisse Alvarado, B.A. Carlos Albizu University, San Juan
  • Darymar Vargas, B.A Carlos Albizu University, San Juan
  • Dannela Carrero, B.A. Carlos Albizu University, San Juan
  • Ninoshka Pérez, B.S. Carlos Albizu University, San Juan
  • Angela González, BBA Carlos Albizu University, San Juan
  • Wanda Serrano Carlos Albizu University, San Juan
  • Karina Berrios Carlos Albizu University, San Juan
  • Emmanuel Quiñones, B.A. Carlos Albizu University, San Juan
  • Ana Acosta, B.A. Carlos Albizu University, San Juan
  • Emmanuel A. Emmanuelli, B.S. Carlos Albizu University, San Juan
Keywords: Prejudicial attitude, LGBT work force, sexuality in the workplace, organizational heterosexism, discrimination at work

Abstract

Through a quantitative, exploratory-descriptive and non-experimental study, the attitude of heterosexual workers towards their LGBTT peers was examined in a sample of 646 individuals. The largest participation was of women (70 %) between the age ranges of 21 to 40 years old. According to the findings, women and people who fluctuate between the ages range of 21 to 40 years old show fewer negative attitudes towards their LGBTT peers. Regarding those who practice some religion, they reflect a more negative attitude versus those who indicated not to practice any, U=57,637.000, Z=6.171, p<.001. In addition, it has been observed that workers who know an LGBTT person show fewer negative attitudes towards their LGBTT peers. Similarly, there were significant differences between workers who had taken a diversity training in their organization versus those who did not, U=36,910.000, Z=-2.785, p<.005. Finally, through a regression analysis, we identified that sex, age, and knowing someone LGBTT are predictors of the attitudes of the workers’ towards their LGBTT peers. We conclude that for companies to manage diversity and promote inclusion effectively, it’s essential to promote the knowledge and exposure of heterosexual workers towards issues that affect sexual minorities; since it also helps to improve their attitudes towards their LGBTT coworkers.

Author Biographies

Joel Rodríguez-Polo, Carlos Albizu University, San Juan

Teaching and research staff of the Industrial and Organizational Program at Carlos Albizu University, San Juan Campus, Puerto Rico.

Carmen Rivera, B.A., Carlos Albizu University, San Juan

Master's Graduate Student of the Industrial and Organizational Psychology Program at Carlos Albizu University, San Juan Campus. 

Patricia Serrano, B.A., Carlos Albizu University, San Juan

Master's Graduate Student of the Industrial and Organizational Psychology Program at Carlos Albizu University, San Juan Campus. 

José Estades, B.A., Carlos Albizu University, San Juan

Master's Graduate Student of the Industrial and Organizational Psychology Program at Carlos Albizu University, San Juan Campus. 

Jeyvelisse Alvarado, B.A., Carlos Albizu University, San Juan

Master's Graduate Student of the Industrial and Organizational Psychology Program at Carlos Albizu University, San Juan Campus. 

Darymar Vargas, B.A, Carlos Albizu University, San Juan

Master's Graduate Student of the Industrial and Organizational Psychology Program at Carlos Albizu University, San Juan Campus. 

Dannela Carrero, B.A., Carlos Albizu University, San Juan

Master's Graduate Student of the Industrial and Organizational Psychology Program at Carlos Albizu University, San Juan Campus. 

Ninoshka Pérez, B.S. , Carlos Albizu University, San Juan

Master's Graduate Student of the Industrial and Organizational Psychology Program at Carlos Albizu University, San Juan Campus. 

Angela González, BBA , Carlos Albizu University, San Juan

Master's Graduate Student of the Industrial and Organizational Psychology Program at Carlos Albizu University, San Juan Campus. 

Wanda Serrano, Carlos Albizu University, San Juan

Master's Graduate Student of the Industrial and Organizational Psychology Program at Carlos Albizu University, San Juan Campus. 

Karina Berrios, Carlos Albizu University, San Juan

Master's Graduate Student of the Industrial and Organizational Psychology Program at Carlos Albizu University, San Juan Campus. 

Emmanuel Quiñones, B.A. , Carlos Albizu University, San Juan

Master's Graduate Student of the Industrial and Organizational Psychology Program at Carlos Albizu University, San Juan Campus. 

Ana Acosta, B.A., Carlos Albizu University, San Juan

Master's Graduate Student of the Industrial and Organizational Psychology Program at Carlos Albizu University, San Juan Campus. 

Emmanuel A. Emmanuelli, B.S., Carlos Albizu University, San Juan

Master's Graduate Student of the Industrial and Organizational Psychology Program at Carlos Albizu University, San Juan Campus. 

Published
2019-10-16